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Customer journey mapping

With customer journey mapping being a growing area of interest over the past few years, it might be a surprise to hear that it is still considered a relatively ‘new’ discipline – 32% of businesses have been conducting journey mapping exercises less than a year, and only 18% doing it for less than 5 years. But what does ‘doing it’ actually mean? And doing it right look like?

Meaning of customer journey mapping

Put really simply, customer journey mapping (CJM) is the process of capturing everything that customers see and experience in the context of a specific customer journey and towards their specific goal/ objective

Doing customer journey mapping right?

With anything new, there tends to be lots of interest – and this has already shown itself in a couple of ways – 1) many organisations are doing it with 67% of organisations claimed to be using customer journey mapping 2) an expanding number of consultancies and agencies alike are offering their journey mapping services 3) available to access templates, standards and ‘how to’ guides to support with customer journey mapping…

With this, we are understandably seeing a number of different approaches being taken to mapping customer journeys – from operationally focused mapping to a puristic customer research piece through to a data driven customer journey project…

We would advocate that doing customer journey mapping ‘right’, whatever the overall approach, should always involve a blend of exercises that involve stakeholder and frontline engagement, primary customer research, customer, operational and commercial data analysis and operational process and systems mapping.

Using the below as a guide should help ensure you have customer journey mapping success:

  1. Aim to have a consistent business-wide approach to customer journey mapping  (test out through an initial pilot study and refine as necessary to ensure the approach works for the business)

  2. Always involve the business / internal view of the customer journey – this should then be followed by the reality of the customer view

  3. Mapping a journey should always involve primary research – at that point in time – read more about why here

  4. Your mapping exercise will be informed by the relevant commercial, customer and operational data that exists within the business

  5. The map will visualise a clear single view – bringing together the internal (business) and customer perspectives

  6. There should always be a plan for how mapping the journey will feed directly in to optimisation of the experience       

Are you considering what the best approach might look like for your organisation? Are you looking to build a business case to conduct customer journey mapping? We’re here to help – e: hello@thisislens.co.uk  t: 0113 344 8640

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Customer journey mapping

We often receive briefs from our clients which are focused on mapping and optimising a specific ‘as is’ customer journey.  The specificity of such a brief suggests that the journey in question is universally defined and understood across the organisation; however, in our experience, this is often not the case.

You might be asking, ‘Why is this a problem?’  Let’s think about a geographical journey – how can you plan or map out your route (and hope to have the best possible travel experience) without an understanding of…?

  • …Who’s traveling (and what kind of travellers they are – needs, preferences, etc.)?
  • …Where you’re setting off from (your starting point)?
  • …Where you’re trying to get to (desired destination)?
  • …Who and what can help you to get there?

The same principles apply to adopting a customer journey approach.  Critically, before starting to map and optimise its customer journeys, a business needs to ensure that journeys are a) universally defined across the organisation and b) that journeys are defined by customer goals (as opposed to a specific channel/ internal process/ product or service). 

A business should therefore begin by building their ‘Customer Experience (CX) Landscape’- a key (yet often overlooked) first step.

What is a CX Landscape?

A CX Landscape documents (at a high level) the key components of the organisation’s CX – based on current state and including both the ‘front stage’ and ‘back stage’ – and shows how key components relate to/ integrate with each other.  More specifically, a CX Landscape is a framework which provides a business with a clear view of:

1. What customers are aiming to achieve with the organisation (on the ‘front stage’)
2. How the business is currently set-up to support and deliver the CX (‘back stage’)


Why is building a CX Landscape important?

Building a CX Landscape is a critical first step as it:

  • Provides a clear definition of a business’ customer journeys representing a consensus on how many journeys the business has, how they’re defined, and where each journey is perceived to start and end. This, in turn, provides a framework for everyone to work from and a clear scope for any subsequent customer journey mapping (CJM) activities
  • Clarifies governance and ownership – and highlights those areas of the CX which are not currently ‘owned’ or where there are differences in opinion regarding ownership and accountability
  • Provides an overview of current measurement activities, which can then be built upon via detailed deep dives/ evaluations (of individual customer journeys) that help to identify the right metrics and measurement approach for the business
  • Highlights any gaps and overlap in terms of measurement, ownership and processes, etc.
  • Informs customer journey prioritisation – with the best will in the world, a business may not have the resources to map or optimise all customer journeys and/or at best needs to know where to start. Once all journeys have been identified, additional data (e.g. relating to drivers analysis, commercial value, customer volumes, customer segments, etc.) can be overlaid to inform journey prioritisation and categorisation (the nature/ current state of individual journeys may demand different approaches)

What should your CX Landscape look like/ include?

Lifecycle phases


Customer lifecycle phases: the typical steps experienced by customers throughout their end-to-end relationship with the organisation


Journeys

Customer journeys:

  • Defined by what customers are trying to achieve with the brand(s)- i.e. customer goals/ intended outcomes
  • Plotted horizontally to show where they sit across the customer lifecycle, with a (perceived) view of where they start and end
  • Including those which are ‘core’ (to the relationship) and ‘ad hoc’ (only experienced by customers in specific circumstances)
  • With a summary of the key channel(s) that each journey can be experienced through


Metrics

Metrics: what are you measuring and where are you measuring it?  I.e. key metrics (customer, operational & commercial) that help the business to assess the extent to which customers can currently achieve their goals




PeoplePeople: who within the business owns each part of the CX – and who else is responsible for shaping, delivering, and managing it?





processes


Processes:
how and where do internal processes align to, and support the delivery of, the CX?





Tech & tools

Tech. & tools: which systems and tools enable the business to support customers in achieving their goals?






Want to find out how we can work with you to build your organisation’s CX Landscape?  Need support with defining your business’ customer journeys?  We’re here to help – hello@thisislens.co.uk or 0113 344 8640…

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Customer journeys, customer-centric, data, Digital customer experience, tech

Our clients come to us at many different starting points and with a range of different business challenges.  Here is a summary of just some of the questions that a customer journey approach has helped our clients to answer…

Business challenges_May 2018 (2) 
































  • What do our customers want to achieve with us and how are we delivering? Customer journeys are defined by customer goals (intended outcomes).  Defining your journeys from a customer perspective identifies why your customers are engaging with your brand – and the goals that you do/ don’t currently help them to achieve.  The extent to which you’re delivering against customer goals should be an ongoing measure of success
  • How do we attract/ convert/ retain more customers through our CX? Many businesses, particularly those with a digital presence / focus, have lots of data on where customers come in to / ‘drop out’ of their CX; however, it is only when we take a journey approach that we truly understand why customers come in or ‘drop out’.  This is often due to the cumulative impact of different touchpoints or the extent to which the business is meeting customers’ rational/ emotional needs throughout the experience
  • When, where & how should we communicate with our customers? The comms / contact strategy and the customer journey are intrinsically linked. A CRM strategy should also therefore be aligned around the customer journey and should be both an input and output of a customer journey mapping exercise
  • How do we improve our CX and where should we prioritise?  The customer journey is a framework that enables businesses to connect all relevant sources of data and insight – customer, operational, and commercial. This provides a business with a holistic picture and enables prioritisation and decision-making
  • How do we deliver a consistent experience?  And where can we differentiate? Many businesses have a brand promise and a CX vision…and some may also have a set of CX principles.  An understanding of customer journeys is then required to ensure that a) these are delivered consistently across the customer lifecycle and b) the business is able to identify the key moments where they can differentiate the experience through ‘signature actions’ that tie into the brand
  • We have a new idea/ product/ service – how do we design the right CX? With start-ups and fintech businesses on the rise, innovation is all around us!  An approach that applies the principles of design-thinking will be invaluable here; taking a human-centred approach and starting with the ‘jobs-to-be-done’, overlaying the possibilities of technology and the requirements for business success
  • What should the ideal ‘to be’ experience look like and how do we close the gaps?  With industry trends/ changes (e.g. open banking), innovation and competitor activity in mind, businesses are understandably looking to the future – understanding the ‘as is’ versus desired ‘to be’ customer journeys informs the CX roadmap and clear actions required to achieve the business’ aspirational state
  • What should our channel strategy be?  How do we future-proof our CX?  There are lots of emerging channels and new tech. that can support the delivery of the CX – AI, machine learning, chatbots, and the ‘internet of things’ (IoT) are all hot topics.  However, just because we can, doesn’t mean we should – a customer journey approach helps to understand the role of different channels and tech. across the CX and identifies where digital is key vs. where phone/ F2F human contact (etc.) is required by customers

Is your business currently facing any of these challenges?  We’d love to hear from you if you’d like to chat through your challenges and how a customer journey approach might be able to help…

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customer experience, Customer journey, Customer journey mapping, Customer journeys, Customer research, customer-first
CJM Pitfalls slides_AS IS




















1. The journey map as the ‘end goal’

The common mistake

  • If the production of a journey map is the main aim, and hopes are on the map to ‘turn insight into action’, then this will lead to disappointment
  • The map might as well be a report, or another way of presenting some information, perhaps just a bit prettier and more visually engaging
  • In this instance, a journey map has no more guarantees of driving action than any other form of an insight-led report or document – a map isn’t magic

Avoiding the mistake…

  • Customer journey mapping should be part of an overall commitment towards taking a customer-first approach
  • Outputs such as the map and action plans are the tools that will support this – only then, will the map become magical
  • The ‘end goal’ for mapping customer journeys should be to provide the business with a way of understanding, improving and managing the customer experience (around customer needs)

 

2. A customer journey defined by a product, channel or service

The common mistake

  • We have witnessed many briefs over the years with requirements to map specific journeys such as the ‘contact centre’ journey, the ‘mortgage’ journey, the ‘personal advisor’ journey
  • This approach is an ‘inside out’ view of the customer journey, whereby the journey is viewed from a business and operational perspective, rather than from how the customer would view their experience
  • Taking this ‘inside out’ approach to mapping a journey would be a mistake and would result in not achieving the true benefits of a customer journey approach

Avoiding the mistake…

  • Customer journey mapping requires an ‘outside in’ view to be taken from the offset; defining journeys according to what customers are able to / want to achieve with a brand
  • Once a business has defined their journeys according to this, customer journey mapping will come in to its own, enabling a business to:
    • Map the end-to-end journey – the start and end points of the journey from the customers’ point of view and all that happens in-between, and not just the interactions with the business itself
    • Understand the role of channel(s), why customers use specific channels and when (by choice or being forced due to issues in other channels), how customers move between channels
    • The needs and wants of customers across the journey, and the intended outcomes – how these differ and the extent to which a brand is delivering on this (according to different goals / intended outcomes) e.g. ‘Outside in’ view: ‘Mortgage journey’, ‘Inside out’ view: ‘I want to buy my first home’, ‘I want to remortgage my house’ etc.
    • The true opportunities to optimise the journey through understanding the emotional and rational context (not just the physical interactions) and the aspects of the experience that a brand could potentially play a role / stronger role in (that they may not know exist or are viewed as ‘out of their control’)

 

3. Building a view of the customer journey through use of existing insight only

The common mistake

  • Use of insight and data that is held internally across the business is critical – in both building an initial view of the journey and to continue to monitor performance of a business’ customer journeys
  • Using this as the only source of insight, however, means that
    • The business does not actually engage with customers as part of the process of mapping journeys, they don’t witness actual customer experiences and the true impact these are having
    • The experiences may be ‘out of date’ – we have been through journey mapping exercises with clients ourselves and witnessed changes to internal processes that have been made internally by the business in-between the time we have mapped the ‘as is’ to the point in which we were optimising
    • The detail gets missed – the detail that can reveal some pretty ginormous issues with the customer experience. A specific example we have come across is where routing of customers between channels appeared so much more complex than the business viewed it. This revealed that the no-one across the business was actually managing the process that enabled customers to successfully book an appointment in the channel of their choice.
    • The emotional context gets lost – ‘People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel’ – with emotion believed to account for 70% of the CX (McKinsey – “70% of buying experiences are based on how the customer feels they are being treated.”). Without this understanding of emotion, how will a business be able to delight customers and truly innovate around their needs?

Avoiding the mistake…

  • Existing insight that is held across the business will be hugely valuable as part of building the view of the customer journey and measuring performance moving forwards. This should not, however, replace the need to conduct primary customer research with customers who are experiencing / have experienced the journey
  • Every exercise that involves mapping journeys should involve direct engagement with customers, be it existing ones, lapsed and prospect – nothing will replace this! CUSTOMER journey mapping – the clue is in the name!

 

4. Customer journey mapping – another term for ‘workshops’
The common mistake

  • As a clientside professional once said to us.. “I’m sure you run a great workshop, just like every other consultant…”
  • Thank you we thought (!), but running ‘another workshop’ is the least of our concerns – it’s the 2000 pain point post-it notes that you are now having to ‘address’…
  • When establishing a clients’ starting point for customer journey work, we also sometimes hear… “We have mapped the journey already – we have run lots of workshops internally”

Avoiding the mistake…

  • Mapping journeys in business / stakeholder workshops are a tried and tested way of mapping the customer journey from an internal perspective – and it’s great to see so many organisations doing this
  • But to us, it’s not just a ‘workshop’, it’s a very strategically planned exercise, call it a workshop or not, it requires:
    • a significant amount of planning and set-up, executed in the right way
    • a very clear set of mapping guidelines and definitions – for mapping key components such as phases, stages, touchpoints, MoT’s etc.
    • an ability to manage and facilitate differing perspectives without it resulting in a ‘battleground’
    • an ability to consider all views without resulting in 2000 ‘pain points’
    • facilitated action planning and continued engagement on the back of the workshops
    • a well-thought out programme of continuous work and assigned responsibility that will make absolutely certain that the end result is not a journey map (in a drawer)

 

5. Frontline representation

The common mistake…

  • Understandably, frontline representation across a programme to map, optimise and/ or redesign journeys can be a challenge – be it a global cabin crew or a UK based small contact centre team
  • Due to resourcing challenges, clients often ask that we forego frontline representation as part of the mapping process

Avoiding the mistake…

  • Frontline are critical – they often have the closest grasp on the customers and they also shed light on the reality of processes, the workarounds and highlight the nuances and the detail of the experience (which can showcase just how inconsistent the customer experience can be)
  • Frontline employees are also the ones that will need to embrace any change so are the people you need to make feel involved from the offset and throughout for the whole exercise to pay off…
  • Plan ahead and accommodate in any way you can to make sure the frontline view is in some way represented as part of the business view of the customer journey

These are just some of the easy mistakes to make…We’d love to hear about your own experiences of customer journey mapping and discuss how to overcome any challenges you might be facing or have faced.

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customer experience, Customer journey, Customer journey mapping capability, Customer journeys, customer-centric, Digital customer experience, financial services, life insurance

The life insurance industry continues to face several long-standing and well-established challenges –  low levels of consumer interest and engagement, a lack of knowledge/ understanding of products, and generally low levels of consumer trust in insurance brands (to name a few). Today, in the age of the customer, life insurance companies are also faced with:

Recently named as ‘Best Online Life Insurance Provider’ at the 2017 Your Money Awards, Beagle Street are a company who have, since starting out in 2012, faced these challenges head on and are truly embracing the age of the customer.  A recent experience of purchasing life insurance with Beagle Street has enabled us to illustrate the key success factors that contribute to them getting it right…

#1 Strong and differentiated branding

I’d personally been putting off purchasing life insurance for months, having done some initial research via specialist online aggregators and then telling myself that I would ‘do it later.’  I was only prompted to think about life insurance again when I saw Beagle Street’s recent TV ad.  My initial reaction was, ‘Who?!’  Being honest, I’d never heard of the brand; however, their informal and friendly branding and tone of voice stood out against my perception that life insurance brands can be ‘stuffy’ – so it got my attention right away.  The ad. went on to build positive perceptions of the brand in two ways – 1) it spoke to me in my own language – plain English, not insurance jargon and 2) it highlighted Beagle Street’s free will service (amongst other things) which, to me, said that the business has integrity.  This wasn’t enough to convert me at this point…but it did put Beagle Street firmly on my shortlist.

Again, I waited a while before acting – prompted to re-engage with the sector by a text message from a (rather persistent) Independent Financial Advisor.  My further research, this time via one of the big four comparison sites, put Beagle Street at the top of the list on price (they were cheaper for a higher level of cover) – reaffirming my perceptions re. integrity. 

What stood out to me next was the ‘about us’ section on their website, which gave me the impression that their proposition genuinely had been developed based on a sound understanding of customer needs…and this, in turn, made me feel that I wanted to take the next step on my journey – a deeper exploration of how they might be able to meet my needs.

#2 A clear and simple explanation of products

I then decided to start the online application process, though wasn’t completely sure if I’d see it through to purchase at this stage.  It’s worth pointing out that I do know a little bit about life insurance, having previously worked with various insurance brands; however, this was the first time that I had personally purchased it – so I’m by no means an expert.

The clear and concise explanation of the different product types was therefore really helpful – not too much information but just enough to confirm that what I thought was correct…and there was further information available if I needed it. 

Image 1

#3 A quick and easy online purchase journey

The application process itself was super quick (it took me about 10mins from start to finish) and was really easy.  A couple of things that contributed to this were:

  • I was able to do a ‘quick quote’ before the full application
  • Throughout the ‘quick quote’ I was only shown one question at a time
  • Questions were displayed in a clear and visual way, using large icons (like in the screenshot above) and boxes
  • The application form was really intuitive (e.g. my personal details were pulled from the ‘quick quote’ through to the full application) and…
  • …finally, it felt like minimal effort for me as I didn’t have to do a lot of typing!

As well as the above specifics, it’s also worth noting that I was able to complete the end-to-end application form online – i.e. via my channel of choice – something that, even today, we shouldn’t take for granted.

#4 A memorable welcome

At the end of the application process a pop-up appeared, offering web chat with a message along the lines of, ‘Hello, welcome to Beagle Street, would you like to chat?’ I didn’t take them up on the offer as, at that stage, I didn’t feel that I needed to; however, it did make me feel ‘welcomed’ as a new customer.   You may argue that they could/ should have offered web chat earlier in the journey (when I may have still had some product-related questions to answer to inform my decision) – and there is definitely a case for this.  However, the fact that it was offered when they already had my business made me feel that they genuinely value me as a customer. They also followed-up quite quickly with an invite to complete a survey, which tells me that they are interested in my feedback – and, as a result, it re-affirmed that they value their customers.

#5 Clear comms. that set my expectations

And last, but by no means least, was the way that they clearly set my expectations at key points in the journey.  Upon completion of the application, I was told the three things I should expect to happen next, alongside my key policy details, who to contact if I had a problem, and three things I may want to do myself (see below).

Image 4

I’ve gone ahead and done the first of those two things and, on their part, Beagle Street both sent my documents and uploaded them online.  However, if I were to highlight one area for consideration, it’s the role that other channels may play in supporting this digital experience/ ensuring a connected experience across channels – e.g. I don’t recall them contacting me directly for my ‘welcome call’ (as promised above).

The impact?

I was left feeling genuinely positive about a) the fact that I had purchased life insurance and b) that I am now a customer of Beagle Street.  I now have high hopes about my experience moving forwards as I sense that Beagle Street values me as a customer – it will be interesting to see if or how they engage with me to remind me of how my policy meets my needs throughout life over the next few years…

 

 

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B2B customer experience, Customer experience strategy, Customer journey, Customer journey mapping, Customer journeys, customer-centric, customer-first, start-up businesses

UK start-up businesses are on the rise – 2016 saw a record number (650,000) of new start-ups, with this trend predicted to continue in 2017. Alongside this, customer experience is being recognised as a driver of growth amongst B2B service providers, yet less than 25% are excelling and only 23% of B2B organisations claim to have a customer-centric approach. With last week marking six months since starting up ourselves as ‘lens’, we wanted to reflect on some of our own experiences to illustrate:

– Why we firmly believe that a ‘customer first’ approach is so important
– How getting the customer experience ‘wrong’ can have a negative impact on customer behaviour, loyalty, and advocacy
– …And why/ where significant opportunities exist for B2B organisations who ‘get it right’

Here, we take a look at some of the fundamentals of a customer first approach and illustrate how they played out across our own experiences when starting out…

#1 – Understand your customers’ mind-set and needs

Taking the plunge into ‘start-up world’ brought about a whole series of conflicting emotions – we were in a place that we hadn’t been in before…a totally different ‘mind-set’. We were very focused on an overall mission – ‘To set-up our business so that we were ready to go on day 1’. This meant creating a ‘to do’ list which included things like registering the business, buying (and setting-up) the right IT equipment, taking out the right business insurance, and setting-up business banking, etc.  Each item on our ‘to do’ list represented an individual customer journey that we would go on, with each journey involving different organisations.

Our mind-set very much shaped our needs, which was somewhat different to what we would want/ need as a consumer – we were a different persona.  In general, we felt that very few of the organisations we dealt with really took the time to understand this.  Some of the banks got off to a reasonable start – they suggested that they had products for us by having the word ‘business’ in the naming of their accounts and, with some, we could then look at accounts for ‘start-ups’ versus those who were ‘already running a business’ or ‘switching providers.’  Beyond this, the questions they asked us were pretty much about facts and figures (e.g. ‘What will your turnover/ net profit be, will you be dealing in cash?’) and not about what we actually needed.

The impact?

First impressions count.  We started out feeling that we weren’t fully understood and that the banks, in particular, weren’t all that interested in us as a business. Turns out, that feeling became a reality…

#2 – Design around customer goals, not a product or a process

After understanding who your customers/ target customers are, the next question a business should ask is, ‘What are customers trying to achieve with us?’  This leads to the identification of customer goals, which define individual customer journeys, e.g. ‘to set-up our business banking.’ 

It quickly became clear that the bank had designed their experience around their product and associated process, not around us achieving our goal.  This was most apparent in terms of where we each perceived our journey to end – to us, being ‘set-up’ meant that we had everything we needed and knew how to access and manage our accounts; to the bank, the emphasis seemed to be on our account being open – they sent out the necessary comms. and then it felt like ‘job done’…

The impact?

In the short-term, we had some issues with setting-up and support was hard to find – we were unsure who to contact, which lead to us sending several emails and making quite a few calls.  This quickly descended in to feelings of ‘what have we done…’

#3 – Map the end-to-end journey, not just interactions with your brand

It’s also important to note where our business banking journey had started, which was before we got in touch with our chosen bank.  We’d begun by researching and comparing bank accounts online and seeking recommendations from other businesses, meaning that we came armed with information, perceptions, and expectations.  This vital context surrounding interactions, including the ‘route’ taken to get to the brand, is often missed by businesses, who often perceive that the customer journey starts at first contact with their organisation. 

The impact?

In our case, setting-up business banking was also just one of the journeys that we were on in our ‘quest’ to achieve our overall mission – and many of these journeys were dependent on each other, e.g. we couldn’t set-up our direct debit for insurance without our bank account details.  Therefore, when we had to wait 4 weeks for an in-branch appointment, it may not have seemed like a big deal; however, to us, this was part of a much bigger picture – meaning it was more of a ‘pain point’ than the bank is likely to have anticipated.

#4 – Understand the rational journey – i.e. the thought process and support needs beyond the product/ service

The bigger picture, and the journeys themselves, were also about much more than the physical interactions (touch-points) we experienced – the more touch-points we went through, the more questions we had…and the extent to which we could get answers dictated our behaviour. 

When it came to laptops, we wanted to know which one was right for us.  We started off in store, where one retailer provided attempted to provide some POS guidance – laptops for different ‘purposes’ (none of which mapped to what we needed).  We reverted to comparing laptops online and managed to narrow our options down by seeking recommendations from friends and family in business and applying some guess work.  To make our final decision, we decided to go in back in to store, where we chose the most expensive of our shortlisted options.

The impact?

You could argue that this was a win for the retailer as we bought the most expensive laptop from our shortlist.  However, we also needed an ‘all-in-one’ printer/ scanner, a cloud-based storage/ file sharing system, and various software…cue more questions. We’d have happily bought them all in one go if we’d have known we could get the answers we needed.  However, the lack of proactive help from the ‘advisor’ in-store meant we decided it would be ‘easier’ to go back online and purchase the other items we needed from elsewhere – so, does this really count as a ‘win’?

 #5 – Understand what matters most (and why) to build an emotional connection

Across the different journeys, we expected to feel a ‘healthy level’ of anxiety – but there were some stages/ touch-points where we felt more anxious.  In some cases, this felt natural; in others, this was due to, or at least ‘heightened’ by, poor customer experience. When we started our business banking account journey, we wanted an in-branch appointment initially – we called to make one, the contact centre ‘pushed us’ back online…and even when we were (finally) at our appointment, it was suggested that an online application might have been better. Whilst online would be our preferred channel in ‘consumer world,’ this was different – we were in a new territory and we had to get this right. 

The impact?

We wanted to use specific channels for specific reasons. Whilst digital channels will enable us to manage our accounts ongoing, at this point we wanted face-to-face contact with someone who would be on-hand to answer key questions we had and would be accountable for helping us to achieve our goal. For the bank, this was a real opportunity to connect with us and start to build a relationship – whilst in the end, they gave us an initial face-to-face meeting, it was with reluctance and we certainly didn’t feel valued. Our stance now is that we’ll stay with them for the free banking period offered by the product; however, beyond that, our decision will depend on how well they respond to what matters to us in future.  Building an emotional connection where/ when it matters most is so important in terms of customer loyalty and advocacy – people will forget what you said or did but will remember, and talk about, how you made them feel.

#6 – Measure the right things and prioritise based on key drivers

The things that matter most to customers should be amongst the things that a business measures – this means focusing on key stages/ touch-points (‘moments of truth’) and the drivers of satisfaction across these interactions. 

The impact?

Our experience has led us to question whether the organisations we have dealt with have designed around the things that are important to start-up businesses specifically… Interestingly, none of the organisations that we have dealt with have approached us to ask us for feedback on our experiences.

Some final reflections…

So… we didn’t have the best customer experiences and we wouldn’t recommend the bank or the retailer…or any of the businesses we dealt with for that matter.

As the start-up market continues to grow, it’s time to take things seriously. Adopt a customer-first approach; Get the customer experience right, identify opportunities to fulfil other needs at the right points, create reasons for business customers to be loyal, and build advocates of the future.

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Customer journey mapping

What will it take to build a customer journey mapping capability within your business?

It is predicted that, by 2018, 60% of large organisations will have their own in-house customer journey mapping (CJM) capabilities.  But what are ‘CJM capabilities’? And what will it take to build CJM capabilities within your business?  

Read about the ‘5Ts’ here: Building a Customer Journey Mapping Capability – lens


Front pic - CJM capability










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Customer journey mapping, Training

Customer journey mapping training – now available to book!

Are you considering how
 customer journey mapping could add value to your business? Book your place on our introductory training session to help you to plan your next steps: 

Date: Thursday 27th April, 2017
Time: 9.15am to 12.30pm
Location: Leeds 

To book your place: Email – vickysmith@thisislens.co.uk

lens CJM introductory training session_April '17

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